KARE/Minneapolis Gives Newsroom’s “Heart and Soul” His Pink Slip

091622219_kare blog 5 600x400You know the guy.  He’s the guy who’s not talent, and not news director, but he somehow makes the trains run on time.  The guy who’s as good in the morning meeting as he is in the convention center for the massive multi-camera remote.  He’s the guy who gets good phoners when a breaker happens in the second half-hour of the noon show.  He’s the guy who takes the news director’s new idea and somehow makes it happen–and look good.

At KARE, he was Lonnie Hartley, Senior Executive Producer, workaholic, and as David Brauer writes in his BrauBlog, KARE’s “heart and soul.”  Hartley’s 70-hour workweeks earned respect from staff, but apparently meant little when corporate cost-cutters ordered another head to roll Wednesday.

As David Brauer put it:  “Insiders say the newsroom had never seemed so shell-shocked as it was today, when a tearful Hartley told his troops goodbye.”

It makes you wonder what we’re doing to our newsrooms.  For years, KARE had the reputation of a real hard news shop, the kind of place young reporters and producers and anchors kept in the backs of their minds:  KARE would be a great place to end up.

Those Live Events with Station Signage, Stage, Field Switching and Tarps for Rain Don't Just Happen by Themselves, You Know

Those Live Events with Station Signage, Stage, Field Switching and Tarps for Rain Don't Just Happen by Themselves, You Know

But more and more, the gutting behind the scenes (and on the air, of course, with familiar faces vanishing) means stations are losing layer after significant layer; the people who get it done but don’t usually get their names in the paper when they get laid off.  The truck ops, the veteran photogs, the MacGyvers of local news who mean so much to news staff, but don’t register in corporate boardrooms.

Sure, things won’t run as well now.  More work to spread around, and some of it won’t get done. When the chips are down, and it’s hitting the fan, maybe magic won’t be made like it used to.  But with the weekend show a one-anchor, one-backpack-journalist effort, and photogs during the week running on a strict no-overtime policy; with engineering cut back and the assignment desk understaffed and inexperienced…does it really matter?

Hartley told David Brauer “I have a huge passion for news — you know what it’s like to break a great story, the fulfillment that comes from that.”  The sad part is, at places like KARE, that’s not the top priority anymore, if it’s a priority at all.

But hey, the new corporate graphics package looks nice.

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2 Comments

Filed under Cutbacks

2 responses to “KARE/Minneapolis Gives Newsroom’s “Heart and Soul” His Pink Slip

  1. Ann Nyberg

    Somebody who still has some brains and knows what news is all about hire this guy quick!

  2. Chris

    It’s a head-scratcher when you see the kind of people being cavalierly tossed aside while much lesser people remain in place. It’s the same thing with the stimulus money and where it is being spent…and where it’s not being spent. The people in charge are making decisions based on a whole set of criteria that’s selfish and puzzling.

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